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Summary

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Title
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1 -Sanders and Hall - 2018 - Trauma-informed care in the newborn intensive care unit: promoting safety, security and connectedness
1 +Shaw et al. - 2013 - Prevention of Traumatic Stress in Mothers With Preterm Infants: A Randomized Controlled Trial
Content
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1 1  |(% colspan="2" %)(((
2 2  == Source ==
3 3  
4 -Sanders M, Hall S
4 +Shaw et al.
5 5  )))
6 6  |(((
7 7  == Year ==
8 8  
9 -2018
9 +2013
10 10  )))|(((
11 11  == Region ==
12 12  
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15 15  |(((
16 16  == Type ==
17 17  
18 -Journal Article – Literature Review
18 +Journal Article – Randomized Controlled Trial
19 19  )))|(((
20 20  == Objectives ==
21 21  
22 -Apply the principles of trauma-informed care, within the framework of the Polyvagal Theory (as described byPorges) to care for the NICU baby, the baby’s family and their professional caregivers, emphasizing the importance of social connectedness among all
22 +Evaluates a 6 session treatment intervention developed with the goal of reducing symptoms of posttraumatic stress, depression, and anxiety in parents of premature infants
23 23  )))
24 24  |(% colspan="2" %)
25 25  
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28 28  
29 29  
30 30  
31 -* Adapted six key principles of a trauma-informed approach (originally created by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration) for a NICU setting:
32 -** Safety for parents and staff
33 -** Trustworthiness and transparency
34 -** Peer Support
35 -** Collaboration and mutuality
36 -** Empowerment, voice and choice for parents and staff
37 -** Cultural, historical and gender issues
38 -* Stress-buffering through strong social supports and connections can mitigate short and long-term impacts, making stressors tolerable (at worst)
39 -* Attention must be paid to those parents whose Adverse Childhood Events predispose them and their babies to toxic stressors
40 -* The care of the parent–baby dyad is ideally supported by a developmentally sensitive caregiving staff
31 +* Intervention group received a combination of trauma-focused treatments, including psychoeducation, cognitive restructuring, progressive muscle relaxation, and development of their trauma narrative. Also incorporated material targeting infant redefinition
32 +
33 +* Intervention was successful in reducing maternal symptoms of trauma and depression when compared to comparison group
34 +* Mothers with higher ratings of baseline NICU stress benefited more compared with mothers who had lower ratings
41 41  )))
42 42  
43 43  |(% colspan="2" %)
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45 45  (((
46 46  == References: ==
47 47  
48 -Sanders MR, Hall SL. Trauma-informed care in the newborn intensive care unit: promoting safety, security and connectedness. J Perinatol. 2018 Jan;38(1):310. Available from: [[https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5776216/||rel="__blank"]]
42 +Shaw RJ, St John N, Lilo EA, Jo B, Benitz W, Stevenson DK, et al. Prevention of Traumatic Stress in Mothers With Preterm Infants: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Pediatrics. 2013 Oct;132(4):e88694. Available from: [[https:~~/~~/www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3784295/>>url:https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3784295/||rel="__blank"]]
49 49  )))
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