From version 9.2
edited by Ann Watkins
on 2019/01/22 19:56
To version 10.1
edited by Doug Maynard
on 2019/01/23 21:30
Change comment: There is no comment for this version

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1 -XWiki.AnnWatkins
1 +XWiki.DougMaynard
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1 -Parents of children with neurodisabilities must find their way to and through multiple systems of support and care in the public and not-for-profit sector. These systems exist within and across various sectors (education, health, social services), and involve professionals and para-professionals from similarly diverse disciplines. It is well known that these systems operate in silos, and there often is little incentive for collaboration. Nicholas and Lach’s research identified that parents often need support in framing what their child’s needs are relative to support access, and in getting to the right systems of support. They have brought together key stakeholder organizations in Vancouver BC, Whitehorse Yukon, Edmonton Alberta, and Montreal Quebec, to begin to develop a collective understanding of how families experience accessing services and the kind of challenges and barriers that families as well as systems face in receiving/providing what is needed. These communities have begun to map their assets related to navigational support for families, and to develop a shared vision of what needs to improve and how jurisdictions and service systems can work together to better achieve improved navigation pathways. Drs. Nicholas and Lach will discuss what they have learned about improving navigation and how collective community impact can be used to bypass inertia and barriers to system change.
1 +Parents of children with neurodisabilities must find their way to and through multiple systems of support and care in the public and not-for-profit sector. These systems exist within and across various sectors (education, health, social services), and involve professionals and para-professionals from similarly diverse disciplines. It is well known that these systems operate in silos, and there often is little incentive for collaboration. Funded by Kids Brain Health Network, Nicholas and Lach’s research identified that parents often need support in framing what their child’s needs are relative to support access, and in getting to the right systems of support. They have brought together key stakeholder organizations in Vancouver BC, Whitehorse Yukon, Edmonton Alberta, and Montreal Quebec, to begin to develop a collective understanding of how families experience accessing services and the kind of challenges and barriers that families as well as systems face in receiving/providing what is needed. These communities have begun to map their assets related to navigational support for families, and to develop a shared vision of what needs to improve and how jurisdictions and service systems can work together to better achieve improved navigation pathways. Drs. Nicholas and Lach will discuss what they have learned about improving navigation and how collective community impact can be used to bypass inertia and barriers to system change.